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news coming into the "newsroom" right now. this is about former president george w. bush. we have just learned from his office that a blockage was discovered in an artery in his heart and he had a stent placed to open the blockage. in a statement coming from his office, it says that during his annual physical examination, which he gets at the cooper clinic in dallas, and this happened just yesterday, that this blockage was discovered then. his doctors recommended that he go ahead with this process, so it's a stent being placed in the artery it appears to open the blockage. this is a procedure that was performed successfully this morning, without complication, according to this statement, this took place at texas health presbyterian hospital. he is, according to had his office, in high spirits, eager to return home tomorrow. so he's still in the hospital. and resume his normal schedule on thursday. certainly, they are saying here that it does appear to be somewhat normal and he's trying to get back to work here already this week. according to the statement, he is grateful, of course, to
president george w. bush made his case for going to war with iraq and why mideast dictator was an essential step for both the united states and the world. >> the iraqi regime is a serious and growing threat to peace. on the commands of a dictator, the regime is armed with biological and chemical weapons, possesses ballistic missiles, promotes international terror, and seeks nuclear weapons. >> nearly 11 years later another u.s. president is explaining why he feels getting involved in the middle east is in the best interest of the u.s. people. my next guest though says the similarities between the two conflicts are few. jane newton small is a terrific reporter and times magazine reporter. you've written an article that a lot of team are talking about for "time," "six ways syria 2013 isn't iraq in 2003." differences you say include how the u.s. is handling the regime, the time commitment given by the u.s., the support from the arab world and yooirp, weapons of mass destruction, and how much support there is from congress. let's begin with the first difference you list. regime change. explain
believed that george w. bush needed to go back to congress for reauthorization of the war in iraq. but as president of the united states, he intervened in libya. he had a surge in afghanistan. and he didn't go to congress for permission on either of those. so i think it's a real interpretation of how -- of how you interpret presidential power and whether he has the constitutional authority to do this on his own. but if history is any guide, i would have to say that president after president does act without congressional authorization. i mean, the last time we really did this was in 2002. and so i think that this president's going to say he's on -- he's on firm ground. what he needs to get is public opinion. >> which seems to have evolved since our polling early in may. numbers are dwindling when it comes to support. jay, gloria mentioned iraq. we heard the president make a big distinction on this. he said it would not be like iraq. take a listen. >> if, in fact, we can take limited, tailored approaches, not getting drawn into a long conflict, not a repetition of, you know, iraq,
not made a decision yet, former president george w. bush is weighing in. >> the president has a tough decision to make and if he decides to use our military, he'll have the greatest military ever backing him up. i was not a fan of mr. assad. he's an ally of iran and he made mischief. the president has to make a tough call. i know you are trying to suddenly rope me into the issues of the day. i refuse to be roped in. >> our chief political analyst gloria borger joins me from washington. you listened to secretary of state john kerry today. you heard the former president, reporters trying to ask questions of him. it's not a matter of what do we do about it, we be the united states? >> i think if you listened to the secretary of state, it was very clear that he believed he didn't need to wait for information from the weapons inspectors, from the united nations. he said very clearly that a u.n. investigators can't tell us anything we don't already know. and between the secretary of state and a background call that senior administration officials had with journalists, it's very clear they b
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